HPC Calls Out Now

There are several EPSRC HPC (high performance computing) calls out at the moment which researchers should be aware of.  All calls have a closing date of the 22nd of March.

ARCHER

EPSRC offers access to ARCHER through calls for proposals to the Resource Allocation Panel (RAP). Users can request significant amounts (>1,000kAUs or >66,667 ARCHER core hours) of computing resource over a maximum 1 year period.

A non-exclusive list of eligible projects includes:

  • Short computational projects that do not warrant a full grant application
  • UK led collaborative projects with international and/or industry partners
  • Joint applications from students (as Co-I) with proven HPC experience (e.g. a successfully completed instant access project) and their PIs
  • Projects that link consecutive standard grant applications or that aid the preparation of a grant or fellowship application
  • Extended feasibility studies and trialling application developments at scale

ARCHER application website

Closing date – 22nd March for Technical Assessment

ARCHER Top-up

The aim of this call is to provide top-up resource on ARCHER for all existing EPSRC grant-holders for a maximum of two years.

ARCHER top-up application website

Closing date – 22nd March for Technical Assessment

TIER 2

EPSRC is offering open access to five Tier-2 High Performance Computing facilities through this call for proposals. The five facilities users can access through this call are: Cirrus, GW4, CSD3, HPC Midlands +, and JADE. Further details on each of these centres can be found in the call document on the EPSRC website. For details on how to access The Materials and Molecular Modelling Hub (MMM Hub), please see their website.

The aim of this call is to provide access to national Tier-2 HPC facilities for adventurous high-risk, high-reward projects that will benefit from the diversity of computing architectures available at Tier-2.

A non-exclusive list of eligible projects includes:

  • Short computational projects that do not warrant a full grant application;
  • UK led collaborative projects with international and/or industry partners;
  • Joint applications from students (as Co-Is) with proven HPC experience and their PIs;
  • Projects that link consecutive standard grant applications or that aid the preparation of a grant or fellowship application;
  • Extended feasibility studies and trialling application developments at scale;
  • High-risk, high-reward projects that would benefit from using novel architectures.

Tier 2 application website

Closing date – 22nd March for Technical Assessment

 

Tackling pollution control in India

Exposure to ambient air pollution causes over 4 million premature deaths each year, with 25% of this burden in India. Half of the world’s 20 most polluted cities are in India and poor air quality there is predicted to worsen in the future. Despite this importance there has been comparatively little air quality research focused on India and our knowledge of the sources and processes causing air pollution here is limited. It is critical to understand the contribution of different emission sources (e.g., traffic, industry) to ambient air pollution to design effective policies to reduce this substantial disease burden.

A study by Luke Conibear from Prof Dominick Spracklen’s group at the University of Leeds is the first to combine high resolution computer simulations with extensive observations to estimate the contribution of different emission sources to ambient air pollution and the related disease burden from exposure across India. The researchers used N8 HPC to run a numerical weather prediction model to simulate air quality over India. In their paper, recently published in Nature Communications, they demonstrate that combustion of solid fuels for household cooking and heating is the dominant source of ambient particulate matter pollution across India. Reducing emissions from this source provides much larger benefits to health compared to control of traffic or industry. Luke’s study provides the evidence needed to design effective pollution control efforts in India.

Modelling the Palaeoclimate with N8 HPC

When the supercontinent, Pangea, broke up during the Triassic and Jurassic periods, there were dramatic changes in Earth’s climate.  Prof David Schultz and his students used N8 HPC to run Palaeoclimate model simulations which revealed the spatial changes in climate between the Triassic and Jurassic.  Their results illustrate that the subtropics became slightly cooler and wetter despite the warming trend for the Earth’s average temperature.  To find out more about the use of “Build Your Own Earth”, please see the N8 HPC case study or the recently published paper in Geology Today.

CP2K User Meeting 2018

CP2K is a freely available open source program for atomistic simulation of condensed phase systems using various levels of theory from classical pair-potentials to Density Functional Theory and post-HF corrections (MP2, RPA, GW).  CP2K can do simulations of molecular dynamics, metadynamics, Monte Carlo, Ehrenfest dynamics, vibrational analysis, core level spectroscopy, energy minimization, and transition state optimization using NEB or dimer method.

The annual CP2K User Meeting will take place in Lincoln on Friday 12th of January 2018.  There will be a mixture of application talks and updates on some of the latest features available in CP2K.  This year’s keynote speaker will be Prof. Jorge Kohanoff from Queen’s University Belfast.

The event is open to all and travel funding is available for UK academics – please submit an estimate of your costs when you register.  Registration is open from now until the end of December 2017.

3rd N8 Biophysical and Biochemical Symposium: Dynamics, kinetics and thermodynamics

The focus of the symposium will be the use of biophysical techniques to determine dynamics, kinetics and thermodynamics of biological processes. Previous symposia have focused on “Biophysics in Native Systems” (2017) and “Multidisciplinary Techniques” (2016). The aim of the one-day symposium is to share research and technical expertise between the N8 universities (Newcastle, Durham, York, Leeds, Sheffield, Manchester, Liverpool and Lancaster) in order to promote deeper collaboration and appreciation for facilities and expertise available across the biophysical and biochemical sciences.

The symposium will be held in Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester on the 12th of January 2018.  All attendees must register for the event.

Login Form